Kathmandu, Nepal - For many in Kathmandu, today is just another in an unfolding disaster that started when a massive 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal on April 25. But some have decided to pause and mark the one-month anniversary and publicly commit themselves to rebuilding a broken county.

A few hundred gathered at the base of what used to be Dharahara - a lighthouse-like tower in the Sundhara area of the capital. A famous landmark standing nine-storeys high, it was a draw for tourists and locals alike, a perch from which to look out over the whole city.

When the quake struck, it was brought down in seconds. About 180 bodies were found in its rubble.

A month later to the minute, at 11:56am on Monday morning, they stood in silence, eyes closed, and paid tribute to those people, and more than 8,600 others killed in Nepal's deadliest natural disaster.

What was notable was what happened next.

A youth organisation leader led the crowd in a public vow of service - a commitment to repair and rebuild. Specifically, they called for non-political, non-governmental bodies to oversee such efforts.

Faith in their politicians is palpably low everywhere.

It was another sign of what we've seen on so many occasions. Individuals are getting on with helping each other and themselves. They continue to work, even after unsafe houses have forced them into tented villages. They drive supplies to far-flung parts of the country.

Their self-reliance and strength has rightly been celebrated. But it's also been necessary.

Source: Al Jazeera