Woman 'aged 120 years old' discovered in Brazil

Maria Lucimar Pereira is indigenous and has reportedly lived most of her life on a reserve in the remote northwest Amazon state of Acre.

    Her name is Maria Lucimar Pereira and she is reportedly 120 years old. No, that is not a typo. One hundred and twenty years old.

    Workers for Brazil’s national institute of social security (INSS) say they discovered her while doing routine checks of state birth records, according to an article posted Friday night on the website of Folha de Sao Paulo newspaper.

    Her birth certificate says she was born on September 3, 1890. 

    Ms Pereira is indigenous, and reportedly has lived most of her life on a reserve in the remote northwest Brazilian Amazon state of Acre, the nearest town being Feijo (population 32,261).

    When social workers found her birth records they radioed the isolated indigenous community where she lives (there is no mobile service) and arranged to have her brought to the nearest town to confirm her identity.

    She is apparently from the kaxinawa indigenous ethnic group, and reportedly she speaks only a few words in Portuguese.

    The social workers are still trying to verify if there were any mistakes made on her birth certificate, but no irregularities have cropped up as of yet.

    If it is verified that Ms Pereira really is 120, she would instantly become the world’s oldest living person - by far.

    Oddly enough, earlier this week Brazilian woman Maria Gomes Valentim passed away. She was 114, and at the time of her death regarded by the Guinness Book of World Records as the oldest living person.

    As for Ms Pereira, it’s said she has 10 kids and 22 grandchildren.

    When there are new developments on this story, I will post them to Twitter @elizondogabriel

    Gabriel Elizondo is a correspondent based in Sao Paulo, Brazil.


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