Final day of campaigning for south Sudan

It’s the last day of campaigning before Sunday's referendum vote, and there’s so much colour and excitement on Juba's r

    It's Friday, January 7 - and I'm waiting on the side of road near Konyo Konyo market (for those who know Juba).

     

    Suddenly a huge crowd starts coming surges towards me. There is singing and marching. There is even a band in the procession.

     

    A big hand-made sign reads “separation oyee!” - and people start hooting their car horns. Cars filed past packed with people all shouting for independence. 

     

    Here, when someone wants to be heard, there is nothing you can do about it.

     

    Traffic literally comesto a standstill. 

     

    It’s the last day of campaigning before Sunday's referendum vote, and there’s so much colour and excitement on Juba's otherwise congested roads. 

     

    A woman who looks to be my mother's age is dancing like a teenager on the road, shouting, “We want separation.”

     

    I've covered many elections in Africa and southern Sudan's referendum is by far the most entertaining and best of them all.

     

    People here who want secession don't seem afraid to express themselves. I'm not used to that.

     

    In Zimbabwe for example, even if one supports the ruling party ZANU PF - some are weary of who they say that to.

     

    It's amazing being here right now. It's one big carnival. Being in a place where history is about to be made and just drinking up the excitement and anticipation of people here is wonderful.

     

    It seems almost a shame to ban campaigning from now on - because the rules say no campaigning 24 hours before voting day.

     

    The south needs more things to smile about. They have so many challenges ahead of them. I suspect many don't even know what lies ahead. 

     

    But that doesn't seem to matter today. It's about celebrating what could be the dawn of a new era.

     

    Anyone who is not here is missing out - it seems history is about to be made in Africa!


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