[QODLink]
Archive
Pakistan frees militant group's founder
A Pakistani court has ordered the release of the founder of an Islamist militant group blamed by India for carrying out the 
Last Modified: 17 Oct 2006 18:12 GMT
Saeed has been under house arrest in Lahore since August
A Pakistani court has ordered the release of the founder of an Islamist militant group blamed by India for carrying out the Mumbai train bombings in July in which 186 people died.

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, the former leader and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, was put under house arrest in Lahore in August, shortly before he was due to address a rally.

 

After being released briefly on August 28, he was re-arrested under a law allowing authorities to detain anyone without trial for up to three months.

 

"The court has declared that the detention of Hafiz Saeed is against the law and the constitution and he should be released immediately," his lawyer, Nazir Ahmed Ghazi, said on Tuesday.

Saeed was still being held under house arrest in Lahore but one of his aides said it was hoped he would be released later in the day.

India attack

Saeed founded Lashkar-e-Taiba in the early 1990s but quit as leader days after India accused it of involvement in an attack on the Indian parliament in December 2001, which brought Pakistan and India to the brink of a war.

Indian police also accused Lashkar and Pakistan's military spy agency, Inter-Services Intelligence, of involvement in the bomb attacks on commuter trains in Mumbai on July 11.

Both Pakistan and Lashkar have refuted the allegation.

Pakistan banned Lashkar-e-Taiba in January 2002.

'Victory for truth'

Saeed became the head of a charity, Jamaat-ud-Dawa, which the US calls a terrorist organisation because of its ties to Lashkar.

Pakistan has put the charity on a watchlist of terrorist organisations but not banned it.

A spokesman for Jamaat-ud-Dawa hailed the court decision as "victory for the truth".

"Hafiz Saeed was detained under pressure from India," Abdullah Montazir said.

"The government should give us an opportunity to respond to the Indian charges instead of taking action against us."

Source:
Reuters
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
Afghan militias have accumulated a lengthy record of human-rights abuses, including murders and rapes.
Growing poverty is strengthening a trend among UK Muslims to fund charitable work closer to home.
A groundbreaking study from Johns Hopkins University shows that for big segments of the US population it is.
Critics claim a vaguely worded secrecy law gives the Japanese government sweeping powers.
A new book looks at Himalayan nation's decades of political change and difficult transition from monarchy to democracy.
join our mailing list