[QODLink]
Archive
Ecuador to investigate electoral fraud
Ecuador's attorney general is to investigate allegations of irregularities in the country’s recent presidential election.
Last Modified: 27 Oct 2006 05:20 GMT
Noboa made a surprising late surge during voting
Ecuador's attorney general is to investigate allegations of irregularities in the country’s recent presidential election.

The vote on October 15 set up a runoff, to be held in November, between Alvaro Noboa, a banana tycoon, and opponent Rafael Correa.

"I have accumulated complaints from different sectors that allege a series of crimes, so I must review them," Cecilia Armas told reporters.

 

Armas said she has up to a year to conclude the investigation.

Final results vote released by Ecuador's Supreme Electoral Tribunal showed Noboa won with 26.8 per cent of the poll, or more than 1.4 million votes. Correa was second with 22.8 percent, wth 217,918 fewer ballots.

The remaining votes were spread among 11 other candidates.

Unexpected lead

Noboa, a pro-free market, old-style populist who pledges to stake his personal fortune to pull a majority of Ecuadoreans out of poverty, made a surprising surge in the final days of the campaign.

His first-place finish prompted cries of fraud from Correa, an anti-establishment candidate who has threatened to default on foreign debt payments in order to fund social programmes.

Correa, a former finance minister, had been the favourite before the vote.

His party reported finding pre-marked ballots outside of polling places, and alleged that rival parties had infilitrated the tables where the votes were counted and totals entered onto tally sheets.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.