President's party wins Congo vote

A bloc led by the country's president has won the Democratic Republic of Congo's (DRC) first free multi-party legislative elections in over 40 years, but failed to secure an absolute majority.

    Kabila's alliance has won more than 200 assembly seats

    Joseph Kabila's Alliance of the Presidential Majority bloc has emerged as the biggest single political force in the country, capturing more  than 200 of the 500 seats in the new National Assembly in elections held on July 30.

    An alliance of parties led by Kabila's arch rival, Jean-Pierre Bemba, the Rally of Congolese Nationalists (RCN), took second place with around 100 seats.

    The remaining seats were shared among independents and smaller political groupings, including the Coalition of Congolese Democrats (CCD) led by Pierre Pay Pay, who served as governor of the country's central bank when DRC was ruled by Sese Seko Mobutu.

    The results were compiled from provisional figures that were released by the Independent Electoral Commission on Friday, and mirror those of the country's first-round presidential election, in which Kabila won the most votes with Jean-Pierre Bemba, the vice president, in second place.

    Political transition

    Jean-Pierre Bemba, Kabila's rival,
    took second place with 100 seats

    The results complete a three-year period of political transition  that followed the vast central African country's five-year civil war from 1998 to 2003, which drew in six foreign armies and claimed more than three million lives.

    Jan Egeland, UN undersecretary-general for humanitarian affairs, said this week that he remained "very concerned" by the situation in DRC, parts of which were still violent.

    The situation in the capital, where the UN and EU peacekeepers are patrolling the streets, remained calm after the final results were announced.

    Deputies are due to take up their seats in parliament in 15  days.

    Kabila and Bemba are to face each other in a second round run-off that is scheduled to take place on October 29.
      
    The elections are to be followed by local polls, and are intended ultimately to lead to the re-building of the war-ravaged central African country.

    SOURCE: AFP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    The woman who cleans up after 'lonely deaths' in Japan

    The woman who cleans up after 'lonely deaths' in Japan

    When somebody dies lonely and alone, Miyu Kojima steps in to clean their home and organise the mementos of their life.

    Putin and the 'triumph of Christianity' in Russia

    Putin and the 'triumph of Christianity' in Russia

    The rise of the Orthodox Church in Russia appears unstoppable, write filmmakers Glen Ellis and Viktoryia Kolchyna who went to investigate the close ties between the church and Putin.

    The chill effect: Is India's media running scared?

    The chill effect: Is India's media running scared?

    Much of India's media spurns a scoop about the son of PM Modi's right-hand man. Plus, NFL as platform for race politics.