Fourth Bali bomber jailed

A young Islamic militant has been jailed for 15 years by an Indonesian court for his role in last year's suicide bombings on the resort island of Bali.

    Solchanudin is the fourth man sentenced over the attacks.

    The chief judge at the Denpasar district court said that Anif Solchanudin, a 24-year-old mobile telephone salesman, was "proven without doubt to have participated in acts of terrorism".

      

    Solchanudin had admitted that he had been interested in becoming a suicide bomber, but denied any advance knowledge of the attacks.

     

    The prosecution had accused him of receiving training to become a bomber.

     

    Judge Daniel Palitin also told the court that the defendant was guilty of charges of possessing explosives. Solchanudin had been found with 29 bullets in his possession.

     

    Prosecutors had sought a 10-year sentence.

     

    Bystanders killed

     

    Palitin said that Solchanudin's "crime is a crime against humanity" and his acts had caused particular suffering to the families of the 20 bystanders killed in the attacks on three busy restaurants on the palm-fringed island.

     

    He also noted that Solchanudin had persisted with his wish to become a suicide bomber, even though death sentences were meted out to three Islamic militants involved in the 2002 bombings in Bali which left 202 people dead.

     

    "This crime caused many victims and loss and the people of Bali are still suffering until now," the judge added.

     

    Solchanudin is the fourth man to be sentenced over the attacks, which are thought to have been masterminded by Malaysian Islamic extremists Azahari Husin and Noordin Mohammad Top.

     

    The other three received sentences ranging from eight to 18 years earlier this month.

    SOURCE: AFP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    More than 300 people died in Somalia but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Japan's third-largest steelmaker has admitted it faked data on parts used in cars, planes and trains.