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Aljazeera rejects al-Qaeda leak claim
Aljazeera has rejected the claim by an American author that it leaked information that led to the capture of leading al-Qaeda figures.
Last Modified: 22 Jun 2006 23:13 GMT
Aljazeera says that it protects the rights of its sources
Aljazeera has rejected the claim by an American author that it leaked information that led to the capture of leading al-Qaeda figures.

Responding on Thursday to a recent interview of Ron Suskind on CNN, Qatar-based Aljazeera said it was "well known for its editorial independence" and its "commitment to protect the rights of sources".

Aljazeera also said it has "never communicated any information that it has obtained to any political, security or any other party whatsoever."

Ron Suskind, author of The One Percent Doctrine, told CNN that information about the hiding places of alleged al-Qaida figures, Khalid Sheikh Mohamed and Ramzi Bin al-Shibh, obtained by Aljazeera in 2002, was leaked to Qatari officials.

Suskind said the information was communicated to the Emir of Qatar, who communicated it to US officials.

Aljazeera described Suskind's claim as ridiculous and baseless.

Khalid Sheikh Mohamed was described by the 9/11 commission report as "the principal architect of the 9/11 attacks," and was believed to be a key figure in al-Qaeda. He was arrested in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, in March 2003 and is currently being held in US custody.

Bin al-Shibh was arrested in Karachi after a shootout with Pakistani security forces in September 2002. He was also handed over to the US.

Source:
Aljazeera
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