N Korea given World Cup TV

North Korean state television has begun broadcasting World Cup matches supplied free of charge by the South.

    North Korea fans should find it easier to watch Cup matches

    The North's Central Television Station aired Saturday's first-round match between England and Paraguay from 1:00 pm Monday, the Korea Broadcasting Commission in Seoul said.

    "We began relaying the World Cup broadcast to North Korea via satellite today after testing it on Sunday," a KBC official told the AFP news agency.

    He said the South was offering the North complete coverage of the tournament in Germany, but refused to confirm reports that South Korea agreed to pay some $150,000 to FIFA for the broadcast rights in North Korea.

    Tapes

    During the 2002 World Cup staged in South Korea and Japan, Seoul sent videotapes to North Korea a day or two after the games. For the 2004 Athens Olympics it offered the North a live feed of major  events.

    Television broadcasts in North Korea generally consist of programmes praising the achievements of leader Kim Jong-il; political melodramas based on the life of his father, Kim Il-sung, the founder of North Korea; and and re-runs of set-piece military parades.

    South Korea, which jointly hosted the last World Cup with Japan in 2002, plays its opening match in the 2006 tournament on Tuesday against Togo.

    North Korea has not qualified for the World Cup since 1966 when it stunned the football world by beating Italy 1-0 to make it to the quarter finals stage.

    SOURCE: Aljazeera + Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Why some African Americans are moving to Africa

    Escaping systemic racism: Why I quit New York for Accra

    African-Americans are returning to the lands of their ancestors as life becomes precarious and dangerous in the USA.

    Why Jerusalem is not the capital of Israel

    Why Jerusalem is not the capital of Israel

    No country in the world recognises Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

    North Korea's nuclear weapons: Here is what we know

    North Korea's nuclear weapons