[QODLink]
Archive
Professor jailed for Islamic Jihad ties
An Arab-American former professor has been sentenced to four years and nine months in prison by a US court for conspiring to aid the Palestinian militant group, Islamic Jihad.
Last Modified: 02 May 2006 01:26 GMT
Islamic Jihad has carried out many suicide attacks in Israel
An Arab-American former professor has been sentenced to four years and nine months in prison by a US court for conspiring to aid the Palestinian militant group, Islamic Jihad.

Sami Al-Arian admitted providing support to Islamic Jihad members as part of a plea-bargain deal agreed in April.

The former professor at the University of South Florida took the deal despite a jury last year failing to convict him on any of the 17 charges he faced - leading the judge in that case to order a mistrial.

The 48-year-old, born in Kuwait to a Palestinian family, admitted he helped Islamic Jihad members claim immigration benefits.

James Moody, a US district court judge, said al-Arian was a "master manipulator" and had lied about raising money for Palestinian charities.

Al-Arian told the Miami court he took responsibility for his actions and was grateful for the opportunities he received in the US, where he has lived for 30 years.

"As I leave, I harbour no bitterness or resentment," he said.

He has denied advocating violence and said he was being persecuted for his outspoken views on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Islamic Jihad has claimed responsibility for a number of deadly suicide bombings in Israel and the Palestinian territories, including an attack in Tel Aviv last month that killed nine people.

Al-Arian is set to be released in eighteen months as he has already served three years and three months in prison.

The court also ordered he be deported from the US on his release.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.