[QODLink]
Archive
Failed female bomber on trial in Jordan
An Iraqi woman who failed to blow herself up in a Jordanian hotel last year went on trial in Jordan, charged in the attacks
Last Modified: 24 Apr 2006 15:32 GMT
The November triple bombing in Amman killed 63 people
An Iraqi woman who failed to blow herself up in a Jordanian hotel last year went on trial in Jordan, charged in the attacks that killed 63 people.

Sajida Mubarak al-Rishawi, 35, is charged with the almost simultaneous attacks on three hotels in Amman on November 9 in which she, her husband and two other suicide bombers took part.

 

Al-Rishawi's explosives belt failed to detonate, and she was arrested after fleeing the scene.

 

On Monday she stood, with chains on her ankles, in the state security court dock.

 

She was alone as she is the only one of the eight defendants who is in custody.

 

The leading accused in absentia is Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the leader of al-Qaeda in Iraq, whom Jordan believes is the mastermind of the attacks.

 

His group claimed responsibility for the bombings.

 

Trial adjourned

 

Sajida al-Rishawi failed to
detonate her explosive belt 

Al-Rishawi, who wore a brown headscarf and dark blue prison dress, told the judge she was "single" because her marriage had not been consummated, and she appealed for legal assistance.

 

"I don't have a lawyer. I have God to defend me. I have no money now to secure a lawyer," she told the three judges.

 

The judges adjourned the hearing after five minutes to allow a state lawyer to be appointed to defend her.

 

Rishawi, who is from the Iraqi town of Ramadi in the western desert province of Anbar, faces a death sentence if found guilty.

 

The hearing was conducted under tight security in a courtroom inside an Amman prison.

 

There were no relatives of the victims in the public gallery, only journalists and police officers.

 

Al-Zarqawi still at large

 

"I don't have a lawyer. I have God to defend me. I have no money now to secure a lawyer"

Sajida al-Rishawi

In the attacks, three Iraqi suicide bombers - including the man that al-Rishawi had married days beforehand - detonated themselves in the hotels, including the Swedish Radisson SAS Hotel where a wedding was under way.

 

They killed themselves and 60 others.

 

Jordanians staged street protests against the bombings, particularly the involvement of al-Zarqawi who was born in Jordan.

 

But al-Zarqawi's group vowed more strikes against Jordan, a staunch US ally that signed a peace treaty with Israel in 1994 and has been the target of several al-Qaeda terror plots because of its moderate stance and criticism of extremist Muslim groups.

 

The state security court has sentenced al-Zarqawi to death in absentia three times for his involvement in plots against Jordan.

 

One of the attacks involved the assassination of US aid official Laurence Foley, who was gunned down outside his Amman home in October 2002.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
As Snowden awaits Russian visa renewal, the world mulls role of NSA and expects more revelations from document trove.
A handful of agencies that provide tours to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea say business is growing.
A political power struggle masquerading as religious strife grips Nigeria - with mixed-faith couples paying the price.
The current surge in undocumented child migrants from Central America has galvanized US anti-immigration groups.
Absenteeism among doctors at government hospitals is rife, prompting innovative efforts to ensure they turn up for work.
join our mailing list