[QODLink]
Archive
FIFA seeks answers over Israeli strike
Football's world governing body, FIFA, says it is considering possible action over an Israeli air attack last week on a football field in the Gaza Strip.
Last Modified: 07 Apr 2006 11:49 GMT
Palestinian boys gather around a crater caused by the strike
Football's world governing body, FIFA, says it is considering possible action over an Israeli air attack last week on a football field in the Gaza Strip.

Jerome Champagne, FIFA deputy general secretary in charge of political issues, said on Friday the attack was a direct strike without any reason.

He said the field was not being used by Palestinians as a missile launching pad, as Israel's ambassador to Switzerland had claimed.

"We have just asked for explanations," Champagne said.

"Football should remain outside of politics"

Jerome Champagne
FIFA

"FIFA has been fighting for more than a century to make this game universal. To hit a football field is really the wrong signal."

Champagne said he had discussed the matter with Sepp Blatter, the FIFA president, and that a decision would likely be announced early next week.

He declined to elaborate on what action FIFA could take against Israel.

"Football should remain outside of politics," Champagne said.

Source:
AFP
Topics in this article
People
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
A handful of agencies that provide tours to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea say business is growing.
A political power struggle masquerading as religious strife grips Nigeria - with mixed-faith couples paying the price.
The current surge in undocumented child migrants from Central America has galvanized US anti-immigration groups.
Absenteeism among doctors at government hospitals is rife, prompting innovative efforts to ensure they turn up for work.
Marginalised and jobless, desperate young men in Nairobi slums provide fertile ground for al-Shabab.
join our mailing list