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FIFA seeks answers over Israeli strike
Football's world governing body, FIFA, says it is considering possible action over an Israeli air attack last week on a football field in the Gaza Strip.
Last Modified: 07 Apr 2006 11:49 GMT
Palestinian boys gather around a crater caused by the strike
Football's world governing body, FIFA, says it is considering possible action over an Israeli air attack last week on a football field in the Gaza Strip.

Jerome Champagne, FIFA deputy general secretary in charge of political issues, said on Friday the attack was a direct strike without any reason.

He said the field was not being used by Palestinians as a missile launching pad, as Israel's ambassador to Switzerland had claimed.

"We have just asked for explanations," Champagne said.

"Football should remain outside of politics"

Jerome Champagne
FIFA

"FIFA has been fighting for more than a century to make this game universal. To hit a football field is really the wrong signal."

Champagne said he had discussed the matter with Sepp Blatter, the FIFA president, and that a decision would likely be announced early next week.

He declined to elaborate on what action FIFA could take against Israel.

"Football should remain outside of politics," Champagne said.

Source:
AFP
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