[QODLink]
Archive
Farrakhan calls for US regime change

Louis Farrakhan, the leader of the Nation of Islam, has called for regime change in the United States.

Last Modified: 27 Mar 2006 22:35 GMT
Farrakhan (C) was in Cuba to discuss disaster management

Louis Farrakhan, the leader of the Nation of Islam, has called for regime change in the United States.

Speaking on Monday, he denounced US policies as wicked because they turned the world against America.

"We need a new government, we need regime change in America," he said at the end of a visit to Cuba.

Farrakhan, who led the Million Man March on the Washington Mall in 1995 to promote black self-reliance, said the Bush administration's domestic policies were "sucking the blood of the poor and the weak".

The controversial African American leader defended Iran's right to develop a nuclear energy programme to reduce dependence on oil and said Washington's opposition was a pretext for a war.

"The Muslim world should unite against America's desire for a pre-emptive strike against Iran and Syria," he said.

Farrakhan said a similar pretext was used by Washington to invade Iraq "to rape the treasuries of the United States of hundreds of billions of dollars to be doled out to the friends of President Bush, Halliburton and Bechtel and associates".

Cuban advice

Farrakhan visited Cuba for a week to learn about disaster management in the wake of the US government's failure to cope with Hurricane Katrina last year in New Orleans, he said.

He thanked Fidel Castro, the Cuban president, and blasted the US economic embargo against Cuba as a "wicked blockade".

The US government has no moral grounds to criticise Cuba, where education and health care are free, he added.

Source:
Reuters
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.