[QODLink]
Archive
Serbs jailed for Croatia massacre
Serbia's war crimes court has sentenced 14 former soldiers to up to 20 years in jail for atrocities committed in the Croatian town of Vukovar in 1991.
Last Modified: 12 Dec 2005 14:15 GMT
At least 200 prisoners of war were killed in Ovcara
Serbia's war crimes court has sentenced 14 former soldiers to up to 20 years in jail for atrocities committed in the Croatian town of Vukovar in 1991.

The court on Monday sentenced eight of the defendants to 20 years of imprisonment for killing "at least 200 prisoners of war" in the hamlet of Ovcara near Vukovar during a three-month siege of the northeastern Croatian town.

Three men were sentenced to 15 years, one defendant was sentenced to 12 years, one woman to nine years and one to five years in jail, while two defendants were cleared of charges.

The trial in Serbia's special war crimes court opened in March last year.

Vukovar was captured by the Yugoslav army and Serb rebels in November 1991 at the end of the siege.

The town was then razed and more than 1000 civilians were killed, including those at Ovcara, 192 of whom have been identified.

After the war ended, the Vukovar region was put under UN administration and was reintegrated into Croatia in 1998.

The International Criminal Tribunal for former Yugoslavia based in The Hague has been trying three Serb officers - Veselin Sljivancanin, Miroslav Radic and Mile Mrksic - with war crimes committed in Vukovar.

Source:
AFP
Topics in this article
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.