[QODLink]
Archive
Polish gay rights marchers face jail
Dozens of gay rights activists could face fines or prison sentences of up to a month for rallying in Poznan this weekend in defiance of a city ban on their "Equality March," authorities said.
Last Modified: 21 Nov 2005 00:08 GMT
Police blocked the parade after a city ban
Dozens of gay rights activists could face fines or prison sentences of up to a month for rallying in Poznan this weekend in defiance of a city ban on their "Equality March," authorities said.

In the latest standoff between an increasingly active gay rights movement and authorities in this staunchly Roman Catholic nation, a few hundred activists staged a demonstration in the western Polish city of Poznan on Saturday, although police had blocked their planned parade route.

Sixty-eight activists could face fines of up to 5,000 zlotys (US$1500) or up to one month in prison, said Miroslaw Adamski, spokesman for the district prosecutor's office in Poznan.

Counter-protests

A spokesman for city police, Andrzej Borwiak, told news agency PAP that about a dozen aggressive counter-demonstrators were arrested.

Some of them threw eggs and chanted slogans such as "We are going to do with you what Hitler did with the Jews," PAP reported.

The Equality March was organized as part of a dayslong festival in Poznan devoted to promoting tolerance. On Tuesday, local authorities banned Saturday's march, on the grounds it posed a "danger to life, health and property."

Poland - a conservative country that joined the European Union last year - has been grappling with the issue of how far to go in accepting homosexuality.

Gay rights rallies in Poland have drawn anti-gay protesters in past years, often resulting in violent clashes.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
Muslim volunteers face questioning and threat of arrest, while aid has been disrupted or blocked, charities say.
Six months on, outrage and sorrow over the mass schoolgirl abduction has disappeared - except for families in Nigeria.
ISIL combatants seeking an 'exit strategy' from Mideast conflict need positive reinforcement back home, analysts say.
European nation hit by a wave of Islamophobia as many young fighters join ISIL in Syria and Iraq.
Featured
Lacking cohesive local ground forces to attack in tandem, coalition air strikes will have limited effect, experts say.
Hindu right-wing groups run campaign against what they say is Muslim conspiracy to convert Hindu girls into Islam.
Six months on, outrage and sorrow over the mass schoolgirl abduction has disappeared - except for families in Nigeria.
Muslim caretakers maintain three synagogues in eastern Indian city, which was once home to a thriving Jewish community.
Amid fresh ISIL gains, officials in Anbar province have urged the Iraqi government to request foreign ground troops.