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Cheap laptops to benefit children soon
The $100 laptop computers that Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers want to get into the hands of the world's children are to be durable, flexible and self-reliant.
Last Modified: 28 Sep 2005 22:42 GMT
The plan is to make laptops available to even poor children
The $100 laptop computers that Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers want to get into the hands of the world's children are to be durable, flexible and self-reliant.

The machines' AC adapter would double as a carrying strap, and a hand crank would power them when there's no electricity.

They'd be foldable into more positions than traditional notebook PCs, and carried like slim lunchboxes.

For outdoor reading, their display would be able to shift from full colour to glare-resistant black and white.

And surrounding it all, the laptops would have a rubber casing that closes tightly, because "they have to be absolutely indestructible", said Nicholas Negroponte, the MIT Media Lab leader who offered an update on the project on Wednesday.

Inspiration

Negroponte hatched the $100 laptop idea after seeing children in a Cambodian village benefit from having notebook computers at school that they could also take home to use on their own.

Those computers had been donated by a foundation run by Negroponte and his wife.

He decided that for kids everywhere to benefit from the educational and communications powers of the internet, someone would have to make laptops inexpensive enough for officials in developing countries to purchase en masse. At least that's Negroponte's plan.

Children are to start getting the
laptops within a year

Within a year, Negroponte expects his non-profit One Laptop Per Child to get 5 million to 15 million of the machines in production, when children in Brazil, China, Egypt, Thailand, South Africa are due to begin getting them.

Big plans

In the second year - when Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney hopes to start buying them for all 500,000 middle and high-school students in this state - Negroponte envisions 100 million to 150 million being made.

(He boasts that these humble $100 notebooks would surpass the world's existing annual production of laptops, which is about 50 million.)

While a prototype isn't expected to be shown off until November, Negroponte unveiled blueprints at Technology Review magazine's Emerging Technologies conference at MIT.

Among the key specs: A 500-megahertz processor (that was fast in the 1990s but slow by today's standards) by Advanced Micro Devices Inc and flash memory instead of a hard drive with moving parts.

To save on software costs, the laptops would run the freely available Linux operating system instead of Windows.

Networks

The computers would be able to connect to Wi-Fi wireless networks and be part of "mesh" networks in which each laptop would relay data to and from other devices, reducing the need for expensive base stations. Plans call for the machines to have four USB ports for multimedia and data storage.  

"They have to be absolutely indestructibleā€¯

Nicholas Negroponte, 
MIT Media Lab leader

This certainly wouldn't be the first effort to bridge the world's so-called digital divide with inexpensive versions of fancy machinery. Other attempts have had a mixed record.

With those in mind, Negroponte says his team is addressing ways this project could be undermined.

Theft-proof

For example, to keep the $100 laptops from being widely stolen or sold off in poor countries, he expects to make them "so pervasive in schools and so distinctive in design that it would be socially a stigma to be carrying one if you are not a student or a teacher".

He compared it to filching a mail truck or taking something from a church: Everyone would know where it came from.

As a result, he expects to keep no more than 2% of the machines from falling into a murky "grey market". And unlike the classic computing model in which successive generations of devices get more gadgetry at the same price, Negroponte said his group expects to do the reverse.

With such tweaks as "electronic ink" displays that will require virtually no power, the MIT team expects to constantly lower the cost.

After all, in much of the world, Negroponte said, even $100 "is still too expensive".

Source:
Agencies
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