[QODLink]
Archive
Moroccan denies creating Zotob virus
An 18-year-old Moroccan accused of having corrupted the computer systems of leading banks, technology companies and media organisations worldwide, is not the culprit, his lawyer has said. 
Last Modified: 13 Sep 2005 15:55 GMT
The FBI traced origins of the virus to a Moroccan website
An 18-year-old Moroccan accused of having corrupted the computer systems of leading banks, technology companies and media organisations worldwide, is not the culprit, his lawyer has said. 

Farid Essebar appeared in front of a judge in Rabat's criminal court on Tuesday after being arrested on 25 August by Moroccan police at the behest of the US Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Moroccan police said the FBI had traced the origins of the "Zotob" virus to a Moroccan website.

"My client did not develop the Zotob virus but did participate in the creation of a worm that infected computer systems," lawyer Mohamed Sertate said.

Zotob allowed its creators to control infected computers from afar and prevented the machines' owners from accessing anti-virus websites.

Victims

The television channels CNN International and ABC News, the New York Times newspaper, computer giant Microsoft and the San Francisco airport were among Zotob's victims.

Sertate said that a Turkish national and not his client, was responsible for the creation of the virus.

A 23-year-old Turkish suspect known as Attila E was also arrested on 25 August in southern Turkey after a month-long manhunt requested by the FBI.

According to American software maker Symantec, the Zotob virus was able to breach security systems in Windows 95, 98, ME, NT, 2000 and XP operating systems.

The maximum sentence for computer piracy in Morocco is five years in prison.

Source:
AFP
Topics in this article
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.