[QODLink]
Archive
UK issues list of unacceptable acts
Britain's government has published a list what it calls unacceptable behaviour, behaviour which could see foreign nationals deported or barred from the country.
Last Modified: 05 Aug 2005 17:31 GMT
Clarke (L) interrupted a holiday to draw up the document
Britain's government has published a list what it calls unacceptable behaviour, behaviour which could see foreign nationals deported or barred from the country.

The document from Home Secretary Charles Clarke followed a series of proposals outlined earlier on Friday by Prime Minister Tony Blair in response to last month's bomb attacks on London.

 

Banned acts would include those which:

- Foment terrorism or seek to provoke others to terrorist acts.
- Justify or glorify terrorism.
- Foment other serious criminal activity or seek to provoke others to serious criminal acts.
- Foster hatred which may lead to violence against specific communities in Britain.

- Advocate violence in support of particular beliefs.
- Anything else the government considers to be "extreme views that are in conflict with the UK's culture of tolerance".

Such views could be aired in the following ways:

- Writing, producing, publishing or distributing material.

- Public speaking, including preaching.

- Running an internet site.

- Using a "position of responsibility" such as a teacher, community or youth leader.

 

Clarke, who interrupted a holiday to draw up the document, defended the government's actions.

 

"In the circumstances that we now face, while treading carefully in areas that relate to free speech, it is right to broaden the use of exclusion and deportation powers to deal with those who foment terrorism, or seek to provoke others to commit terrorist acts," he said.

 

"I believe that these powers need to be applied more widely and systematically both to people before they come to the UK and when they are here."

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.