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UK, Jordan move on deportation deal
The UK has taken a first step towards striking a deal with Jordan to enable it to deport Jordanians seen as a menace, one of several measures to crack down on so-called hate preachers.
Last Modified: 20 Jul 2005 15:54 GMT
The measures follow bombings in London on 7 July
The UK has taken a first step towards striking a deal with Jordan to enable it to deport Jordanians seen as a menace, one of several measures to crack down on so-called hate preachers.

The British government hopes to have similar arrangements with other countries, notably in North Africa, and wants to bolster powers to exclude from Britain or expel anyone who incites or condones acts of terrorism in preaching or writing.
   
The measures follow bombings in London on 7 July that killed more than 50 people.

Police suspect four British Muslims blew themselves up on three underground trains and a bus.
  
In the past, human rights laws have thwarted efforts to expel people who have preached violence while in the country. 
   

Home Secretary Charles Clarke
expects the deal to be signed soon

Under the agreement with Jordan, the Amman government would have to guarantee a deportee would not be tortured or otherwise mistreated at home and would not face the death penalty. 
   
Home Secretary Charles Clarke told parliament he expected the agreement to be signed as soon as possible.

British courts must first rule on any deportation.
   
The deal comes as politicians and the media step up pressure on Prime Minister Tony Blair to deport foreign-born clerics who preach violence or incite acts of terror in Britain.
   
Blair's spokesman said earlier that the agreement was part of a drive to step up monitoring of "what people say".

He would not say whether London had any Jordanian nationals in its sights.

New offences
   
Britain plans to create three new offences under terror laws to be brought before parliament in October. 
   

"I've decided it's right to broaden the use of these powers to deal with those who foment terrorism or seek to provoke others to terrorism acts"

Charles Clarke,
UK home secretary

They will cover "acts preparatory to terrorism" such as financing or aiding attacks, the glorifying or condoning of terrorism, and giving and receiving training in terrorism. 

"In the circumstances we now face, I've decided it's right to broaden the use of these powers to deal with those who foment terrorism or seek to provoke others to terrorism acts," Clarke said. 
    
He also said the government planned to broaden powers to deport or exclude people from Britain who are deemed "not conducive to the public good".   

He will draw up a list of "unacceptable behaviours" including preaching, running websites or writing articles that are intended to incite or provoke terrorism.
   
British officials would draw up a database of "individuals around the world who demonstrate the relevant behaviours", which would highlight individuals to immigration officials, he said, adding that anyone given asylum in Britain who then commits any of the banned activities could have asylum status revoked.

Source:
Reuters
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