[QODLink]
Archive
Indian court sentences al-Qaida plotter
An Indian court has jailed a man for plotting to crash passenger jets into the House of Commons and the Tower Bridge in London on 11 September 2001.
Last Modified: 22 Jul 2005 12:27 GMT
The man was planning to attack two London landmarks
An Indian court has jailed a man for plotting to crash passenger jets into the House of Commons and the Tower Bridge in London on 11 September 2001.

The court in the western Indian city of Mumbai handed down a seven-year prison term to Mohammed Afroze, who had also confessed to plotting with a group of al-Qaida operatives to attack Melbourne's Rialto Towers and the Indian parliament in 2001.

Afroze told the police in Mumbai after fleeing from Britain to India four years ago that he and seven al-Qaida operatives planned to hijack the passenger jets at Heathrow and fly them into the two London landmarks.

Mission aborted

The squads which included men from Bangladesh, Afghanistan and Pakistan booked themselves on two Manchester-bound flights but the group panicked and fled just before they were due to board.

Afroze was arrested at a Mumbai city hotel in October 2001 and charged under a tough anti-terror Indian law.

Indian judge A P Bhangale charged Afroze with criminal conspiracy, forgery and for "committing depredation on territories at peace with India," court officials said.

The judge, however, acquitted Afroze's brother, Mohammad Farooq Abdul Razaq, because police failed to produce sufficient evidence for his prosecution, the officials said.

Razaq was charged with helping Afroze to travel abroad and learn to fly passenger planes, officials said. 

Source:
AFP
Topics in this article
People
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Despite 14-year struggle for a new mosque in the second-largest city, new roadblocks are erected at every turn.
Authorities and demonstrators have shown no inclination to yield despite growing economic damage and protest pressure.
Lebanese-born Rula Ghani may take cues from the modernising Queen Soraya, but she'll have to proceed with caution.
One of the world's last hunter-gatherer tribes has been forced from the forest it called home by a major dam project.
Chinese authorities scramble to cut off information on Hong Kong protests from reaching the mainland.