[QODLink]
Archive
Yemeni preacher sentenced to death
A special Yemeni court has sentenced a Muslim preacher to death and another to eight years in jail for backing a rebel movement and spying.
Last Modified: 29 May 2005 13:18 GMT
The judge had the defendants evicted while giving the verdict
A special Yemeni court has sentenced a Muslim preacher to death and another to eight years in jail for backing a rebel movement and spying.

Aljazeera's correspondent in Sanaa said the criminal court, which deals with terrorism cases, awarded the death penalty to Ali Yahya on Sunday for supporting what the Yemeni authorities described as the "rebellion" that was led by the Zaidi Shia cleric, Shaikh Badr al-Din al-Huthi, and his son in the north of Yemen.

Yahya was accused of contacting foreign countries.

Furthermore, the court handed out an eight-year prison sentence to Yahya's friend, Muhammad Miftah, after convicting him of incitement of violence and sectarianism.

Reuters said the court accused the duo of wanting to overthrow the Arab country's republican system by supporting the rebellion launched last year by supporters of al-Huthi.

The judge evicted the defendants, who gave sermons in Sanaa mosques, before announcing the verdict because they were loudly reciting the Quran.

Their lawyers said they would appeal.

It was unclear for which foreign country the men had been found guilty of spying, though prosecutors had mentioned Iran in the early stages of the trial, which lasted five months.
   
Yemen says the northern rebels want to install clerical rule and preach violence against the US and Israel. The group is not linked to al-Qaida.

Source:
Aljazeera + Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.