Marine cleared of Falluja killing

The US Marine Corps has ruled that no charges will be filed against a marine in the fatal shooting of a wounded and unarmed Iraqi in a Falluja mosque last November in an incident shown in a television pool report, a spokesman has said.

    The Marine Corps said the soldier fired in self-defence

    After a five-month investigation, the Marine Corps determined that the marine corporal fired in self-defence and will not face court martial, spokesman Lieutenant-Colonel T V Johnson said.

    "The commanding general of the First Marine Division determined that the action of the Marine involved in the incident was pretty much consistent with the established rules of engagement and the law of armed conflict," Johnson told CBS Radio.

    NBC News reported earlier that the decision was based partly on the fact that marines had been warned fighters were feigning death and booby-trapping bodies and that the corporal apparently feared for his life when he fired the shots.

    Second incident investigated

    The Marine was seen in images on the videotape that was shared with other news organisations. NBC said a second marine remains under investigation for shooting another unarmed man in the mosque.

    The US military opened the investigation into possible war crimes after the incident was recorded by an NBC television crew embedded with the marines.

    The Iraqi was one of five wounded left in the mosque after the marines fought their way into Falluja, then held by fighters.

    SOURCE: Reuters


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Almost 300 people died in Mogadishu but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Japan's third-largest steelmaker has admitted it faked data on parts used in cars, planes and trains.