Drivers die in Afghan ambush

Fifteen people have been killed, including two children in three separate incidents in Afghanistan.

    Afghan children were killed in a Kandahar bomb attack

    Suspected Taliban fighters ambushed a convoy of civilian trucks carrying vehicles to the US military in southern Afghanistan, killing eight of the drivers.

    The armed men attacked the trucks on Friday after they crossed the Pakistani border at Spin Boldak, 90km (55 miles) south of Kandahar city, Spin Boldak District Chief Faz al-Din Agha said.

     

    Aljazeera reported eight Pakistani drivers were killed in a hail of gunfire that severely damaged the trucks and two of the military vehicles, Agha said.

     

    He did not identify the types of vehicles being transported.

     

    Another driver escaped and told authorities four armed men had appeared in front of the convoy and opened fire, Agha said.

     

    Agha blamed Taliban fighters for the attack, but provided no evidence to support his claim.

     

    A spokeswoman for the US military in Kabul said she was unaware of the incident.

     

    Bomb blast

     

    A roadside bomb exploded late on Friday in southern Kandahar province killing two children, said Interior Ministry spokesman Lutfullah Mashal.

     

    The Taliban are suspected of
    carrying out the attacks

     

    Another explosion on Friday blew up a tractor-trolley in the northern provincial capital Mazar-i-Sharif, leaving two dead and five wounded, Mashal said.

     

    Authorities said they had no immediate clues as to who might have carried out the attacks, but such incidents have previously been linked to Taliban fighters.

     

    There has been a resurgence of attacks since the end of the harsh Afghan winter, countering statements from US commanders and Afghan officials that the country is secure more than three years after the former Taliban government was driven out.

    SOURCE: Aljazeera + Agencies


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