[QODLink]
Archive
Thousands mourn Lebanon ex-minister

Thousands of mourners have attended the funeral of former Lebanese minister Basil Flaihan, who died from wounds suffered in the bomb blast that killed former prime minister Rafiq al

Last Modified: 22 Apr 2005 14:59 GMT
Former minister Basil Flaihan died in a military hospital near Paris

Thousands of mourners have attended the funeral of former Lebanese minister Basil Flaihan, who died from wounds suffered in the bomb blast that killed former prime minister Rafiq al-Hariri.

The body of Flaihan, al-Hariri's close aide and one of the architects of his economic policies, was flown to Beirut on Thursday night from France where he died from serious burns suffered in the 14 February bombing.

  

The cortege - led by government ministers, ministers of parliament and al-Hariri's son and heir Saad al-Din - set out from the al-Hariri family residence to the nearby home of the slain minister.

  

A funeral was to be held at a Protestant church in the city centre before the burial.

  

Flaihan, 42, died on Monday in a military hospital near Paris where he had been taken immediately after the bombing.

 

His death brought the toll from the blast to 20.

 

Tent set up

  

A tent had been set up in the central Martyrs' Square for prayers for Flaihan, a Protestant MP from al-Hariri's parliamentary bloc who served as economy and trade minister between 2000 and 2004.

  

US-educated, with an MA from Yale University and a PhD in economics from Columbia University, Flaihan worked for the World Bank and the UN Development Programme before launching his political career in 2000 when he was elected to parliament.

  

He is survived by his wife, Yasma, and two young children.

Source:
AFP
Topics in this article
People
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
'I'm dying anyway, one piece at a time' said Steve Fobister, who suffers from disabilities caused by mercury poisoning.
The world's newest professional sport comes from an unlikely source: video games.
The group's takeover of farms in Qaraqosh, 30km from Mosul, has caused fear among residents, and a jump in food prices.
Protests and online activism in recent months have brought a resurgence of ethnic Oromo nationalism in Ethiopia.
Chemotherapy is big business, but some US doctors say it could be overused and are pushing for cheaper and better care.
join our mailing list