Sunni speaker nominee slams critics

The Sunni Arab candidate for the post of National Assembly speaker has criticised the Shia-led United Iraqi Alliance for rejecting his nomination.

    Tuesday's National Assembly session failed to name a speaker

    On Wednesday, a group of Sunni leaders nominated lawmaker Mishaan al-Jiburi as their candidate, although it was not clear if he had the backing of the entire Sunni community

     

     

    Al-Jiburi was nominated at a meeting attended by representatives of the Iraqi Islamic Party (IIP), Sunni Waqf (endowment), Iraqi Independent Democratic Gathering (IIDG), the Iraqiyyun (Iraqis) Gathering, Constitutional Monarchy Movement of Iraq (CMMI) and the Arab Democratic Party (ADP), as well as other political and tribal groupings.

     

    However, by Thursday afternoon, some lawmakers in the Shia clergy-led United Iraqi Alliance coalition - which won 140 of the 275 seats in parliament - objected to the choice.

     

    "He's unacceptable," said Ali al-Dabagh of the Alliance. "He does not represent all the Sunnis."

     

    Standing firm

     

    But al-Jiburi said he was not going to back down as the Sunni candidate and bitterly criticised Shia lawmakers for rejecting his nomination.

     

    "This Alliance rejected me because I defend the rights of the Arab Sunni community," he said.

     

    He also cited his support of the "honourable national resistance" as a factor.

     

    "They accused me of being a Baathist - I have never been a member of the Baath party, although I do not find membership to be something insulting," al-Jiburi said.

     

    Al-Jiburi said every grouping should have the right to choose its own candidate without interference from other factions.

     

    He said no objections were made when "Iranian citizens assumed their seats of responsibility in the National Assembly", but refrained from elaborating.

     
    Lawmakers were scheduled to hold a formal session on Sunday to resolve the issue.

    SOURCE: Aljazeera + Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Why some African Americans are moving to Africa

    Escaping systemic racism: Why I quit New York for Accra

    African-Americans are returning to the lands of their ancestors as life becomes precarious and dangerous in the USA.

    Why Jerusalem is not the capital of Israel

    Why Jerusalem is not the capital of Israel

    No country in the world recognises Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

    US: Muslims to become second-largest religious group

    US: Muslims to become second-largest religious group

    By 2050 the number of Muslims is projected to reach 8.1 million, or 2.1 percent, of the total US population.