Chad to resume mediation in Darfur

Chad has decided to resume efforts to mediate an end to a bloody conflict in Sudan's western Darfur region after receiving assurances that Sudan will move against Chadian insurgents based in that country, a spokesman said.

    Chad accused Sudan of training Chadian rebels

    President Idriss Deby suspended Chad's role as mediator in the Darfur conflict on Monday because his government claimed Sudan recruited, trained and armed 3000 Chadian rebels near their common border in an effort to destabilize Chad.

    Presidential spokesman Abderahmane Khoulamallah said on Saturday a special envoy of Sudanese President Umar al-Bashir, Ahmad Umar Badr, assured Chadian officials that Sudan would move against Chadian rebels operating from bases in Sudan.

    In return, Deby agreed to resume his role as a mediator in talks to end the conflict in Darfur.

    Darfur crisis

    The Darfur crisis broke out two years ago when rebels in the region took up arms against Sudan's government.

    The conflict has since killed about 180,000 people, mainly from war-induced hunger and disease, according to UN estimates.

    The Darfur insurgents draw support from the Zaghawa, Fur and Masalit tribes, which live on both sides of the border between Chad and Sudan. The African tribesmen rebelled against what they regarded as unjust treatment by the Sudanese government in their struggle over land and resources with Arab countrymen.

    Deby is a Zaghawa and Sudan has previously accused Chad of backing the Darfur rebels.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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