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Kuwaiti court convicts lawyer

A Kuwaiti lawyer says a court has convicted him after he publicly accused security officers of torturing Muslim insurgents in custody, but no sentence has been issued against him.

Last Modified: 12 Apr 2005 19:35 GMT
Usama al-Munawar was accused of undermining Kuwait's image

A Kuwaiti lawyer says a court has convicted him after he publicly accused security officers of torturing Muslim insurgents in custody, but no sentence has been issued against him.

Usama al-Munawar, known for defending Islamists, told AFP he was warned to keep good conduct for one year after he was convicted on Tuesday of undermining the emirate's image abroad and its economy.

In interviews with Arab television channels Aljazeera and Abu Dhabi TV last September, al-Munawar said security personnel had tortured Islamist activists, who are currently on trial on suspicion of recruiting anti-US fighters for Iraq.

The criminal court is scheduled to issue a verdict against all 22 Islamist activists on 17 April.

In a separate case, al-Munawar was released in February on a $6800 bail after three weeks in custody on suspicion of giving money to Kuwait's most wanted man, Khalid al-Dusari, suspected of being linked to Muslim fighters who clashed with security forces in January.

In December, the judicial disciplinary committee waived al-Munawar's one-year suspension from practising law for allegedly leaking investigation details to the media.

Source:
AFP
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