Heinz recalls cancer-causing products

US food giant Heinz has issued a recall of chilli sauces, chilli oils and other products in China suspected of containing a cancer-causing agent, China state press says.

    Officials launched massive inspections for Heinz products

    The recall comes after the red dye, Sudan-I, was found last week in a pepper sauce made by a Heinz subsidiary, the Heinz Meiweiyuan Food Co based in Guangzhou, capital of southern China's Guangdong province.

     

    The dye is also at the centre of a European health scare.

     

    Following the discovery, the State Administration for Quality Supervision and Inspection and Quarantine ordered the company to immediately recall all suspected products and banned their sale.

     

    "Heinz has told its distributors and sales agencies across the country to recall the suspected products," Charles Chyi, regional president of Heinz (China) Investment Co Ltd, said on Sunday, the China Daily reported.

     

    Company officials were not immediately available to comment on the report.

     

    According to a local quality supervision department, six products produced by Heinz companies were suspected of containing Sudan-I.

     

    Supermarkets in Guangdong's capital have been ordered to stop selling pepper-related products manufactured by Heinz, the China Daily quoted an official with the Guangdong quality supervision administration as saying.


    Inspections

    The authorities there on Sunday launched a province-wide inspection of pepper and sauce-related products and would also inspect Heinz's food suppliers and related companies this week to find the sources of Sudan I.  

     

    "Heinz has told its distributors and sales agencies across the country to recall the suspected products"

    Charles Chyi, regional president of Heinz (China) Investment Co

    The cancer-causing dye was found by the Food Standards Agency of Britain on 18 February in a batch of chilli powder made by Premier Foods, one of the country's largest food and beverage companies.

     

    The agency also found the dye in products of companies such as Schweppes, Coca Cola and Unilever.

     

    Sudan-I is traditionally used for colouring solvents, oils, waxes, petrol and shoe and floor polishes.

    SOURCE: AFP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Why Jerusalem is not the capital of Israel

    Why Jerusalem is not the capital of Israel

    No country in the world recognises Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

    Inside the world of Chinese bitcoin mining

    Inside the world of Chinese bitcoin mining

    China is one of the main exchange markets and hosts some of the biggest bitcoin 'mining pools' in the world.

    Africa is not poor, we are stealing its wealth

    Africa is not poor, we are stealing its wealth

    It's time to change the way we talk and think about Africa.