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Memo warned Bush of al-Qaida threat
A recently declassified memo warned the Bush administration of al-Qaida's threat to the US and the Muslim world before 9/11.
Last Modified: 11 Feb 2005 02:43 GMT
Clark got his meeting only a week prior to the 9-11 attacks
A recently declassified memo warned the Bush administration of al-Qaida's threat to the US and the Muslim world before 9/11.

Critics have said that the warning went unheeded by US President George Bush until the 11 September 2001 attacks.

 

The memo dated 25 January 2001 - five days after Bush took office - was an essential feature of last year's hearings into intelligence failures before the attacks on New York and Washington.

 

A copy of the document was posted on the National Security Archive website on Thursday.

 

The memo, from former counterterrorism chief Richard Clarke to then-national security adviser Condoleezza Rice, had been described during the hearings but its full contents had not been disclosed.

 

Clarke, a holdover from Bill Clinton's administration, had requested an immediate meeting of top national security officials as soon as possible after Bush took office to discuss combating al-Qaida.

 

He described the network as a threat with broad reach.

 

Al-Qaida's Asian threat

 

"Al-Qaida affects centrally our policies on Pakistan, Afghanistan, Central Asia, North Africa and the GCC [Gulf Arab states]. Leaders in Jordan and Saudi Arabia see al-Qaida as a direct threat to them," Clarke wrote.

 

Rice (L) was warned of al-Qaida's
threat when she first took office

"The strength of the network of organisations limits the scope of support friendly Arab regimes can give to a range of US policies, including Iraq policy and the [Israeli-Palestinian] peace process. We would make a major error if we underestimated the challenge al-Qaida poses."

 

The memo also warned of overestimating the stability of moderate regional allies threatened by al-Qaida.

 

It recommended that the new administration urgently discuss the al-Qaida network, including the magnitude of the threat it posed and strategy for dealing with it.

 

The document was declassified on 7 April 2004, one day before Rice's testimony before the September 11 commission.

 

It was released recently by the National Security Council to the National Security Archive - a private library of declassified US documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act.

 

The meeting on al-Qaida requested by Clarke did not take place until 4 September 2001, one week before 9/11. 

Source:
Reuters
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