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Quraya to present new cabinet list
Palestinian prime minister Ahmad Quraya has scrapped his proposed cabinet line-up and will present a radically altered new list of ministers, officials said.
Last Modified: 22 Feb 2005 15:09 GMT
Abbas is said to have had doubts about Quraya's original proposal
Palestinian prime minister Ahmad Quraya has scrapped his proposed cabinet line-up and will present a radically altered new list of ministers, officials said.

Quraya and Palestinian leader Mahmud Abbas met early on Tuesday afternoon, and Fatah MP and central committee member Abbas Zaki said on Tuesday the pair had agreed on a final cabinet make-up. 
 
"Abu Ala will present the final list of names to Fatah central committee later this afternoon and the parliament will convene tomorrow," he said, hinting that Quraya was out of the woods.

Quraya is popularly known as Abu Ala.

  
New list

While there were no immediate details on who would be included in his new cabinet, the initial list presented by Quraya to the parliament on Monday featured 15 deputies. 
  

"It's a government
of technocrats with
only two MPs. This
is the decision we
have reached"

Abbas Zaki,
Fatah MP

Quraya drew up his new list after a meeting of the dominant Fatah faction's central committee, convened in the aftermath of Monday's aborted parliamentary session when he had hoped to win the approval of MPs for his 24-strong ministerial team. 
  
"There will only be two members from the legislative council on the new list," current minister without portfolio Qaddura Faris told reporters.
  
"A totally new government will be presented to us. It's a government of technocrats with only two MPs. This is the decision we have reached," Zaki said.
  
"The central committee of Fatah decided that such a government is needed to respond to the needs of reforms at all levels."

Source:
AFP
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