Sudan to use pound tender again

Sudan has said it will revert to using the pound as legal tender, abandoning the dinar that the government adopted in the mid-1990s.

    The move comes as part of the north-south peace deal

    Central Bank governor Sabir Muhammad al-Hasan made the announcement on Saturday after a joint committee of delegates from the government and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement (SPLM) agreed on the issue at a meeting in Kenya.

    Khartoum and the SPLM signed a peace agreement in Nairobi last month ending more than two decades of civil war between southern and northern Sudan, the longest-running conflict in Africa.

    Under the terms of the agreement, the north will have an Islamic-based monetary system and the south a Western system regulated by a central bank. 

    Southerners rejected the dinar due to its perceived Islamic character and said they wanted a currency that reflected the country's cultural and historical diversities.

    Al-Hasan told the official Suna news agency that the joint committee in Kenya would continue its meetings with the aim of determining the value, design and features of the new currency.

    The dinar is equivalent to 10 Sudanese pounds and is officially pegged at 250 dinars to the US dollar.

    SOURCE: Reuters


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