[QODLink]
Archive
Dean chosen to lead US Democrats

Howard Dean, whose high-flying presidential bid collapsed in disarray one year ago, won the post of Democratic chairman and will take up the job of leading the party back from November's election losses.

Last Modified: 12 Feb 2005 17:20 GMT
Dean is a fierce critic of the war in Iraq

Howard Dean, whose high-flying presidential bid collapsed in disarray one year ago, won the post of Democratic chairman and will take up the job of leading the party back from November's election losses.

The former Vermont governor was elected chairman of the Democratic National Committee on Saturday, replacing Terry McAuliffe.

The resurgence of Dean, an early and fierce critic of the Iraq war and President George Bush, comes three months after a presidential election that some Democrats saw as a signal the party needed a more moderate approach to broaden its appeal in the southern and mountain states.

But Dean countered those concerns and wooed party leaders with promises to focus on state operations, energise the party's grass roots and build an army of small donors similar to the one that supported his presidential bid.

The election offers vindication and a new role for Dean, the one-time presidential frontrunner who attracted young voters to the party and broke Democratic records with his internet-based fundraising before his campaign ran out of steam.

Voters in Iowa and New Hampshire soured on Dean's blunt style and turned to what they viewed as a more electable alternative in Massachusetts Senator John Kerry, who lost the campaign to Bush in November.

Source:
Reuters
Topics in this article
People
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Private citizens take initiative to help 'irregular' migrants, accusing governments of excessive focus on security.
Indonesia's cassava plantations are being killed by mealybugs, and thousands of wasps will be released to stop them.
Violence in Ain al-Arab has prompted many Kurdish Syrians to flee to Turkey, but others are returning to battle ISIL.
Unelected representatives quietly iron out logistics of massive TPP and TTIP deals among US, Europe, and Asia-Pacific.
Led by students concerned for their future with 'nothing to lose', it remains to be seen who will blink first.