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US general finds fun in killing
According to an NBC-affiliated website, a US general in charge of troops in Iraq h
Last Modified: 04 Feb 2005 19:03 GMT
A number of US servicemen are facing action for prison abuses
According to an NBC-affiliated website, a US general in charge of troops in Iraq has said he derived pleasure from partaking in fighting and killing people.

Speaking at a panel discussion on Tuesday, Lieutenant-General James Mattis, responsible for Camp Pendleton's 1st Marine Division in Iraq, said he had fun shooting Afghan men who he claimed beat women for five years.

 

"You know, guys like that ain't got no manhood left anyway. So, it's a hell of a lot of fun to shoot them," he said to clapping from the panel's audience.

 

According to NBCSanDiego.com, Mattis is quoted as saying: "Actually, it's a lot of fun to fight. You know, it's a hell of a hoot. I like brawling."

 

Lt-Gen Mattis served in
Afghanistan and Iraq

The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), a Muslim civil liberties group, called on the Pentagon to discipline Mattis for the remarks.

"We do not need generals who treat the grim business of war as a sporting event," said the council's executive director, Nihad Awad. "These disturbing remarks are indicative of an apparent indifference to the value of human life."

 

Satan in Falluja

 

In November, US Marine Colonel Gareth Brandl caused an uproar when he claimed that Satan lived in Falluja – a pretext for attacking the town of 300,000.

 

"The marines that I have had wounded over the past five months have been attacked by a faceless enemy. But the enemy has got a face. He's called Satan. He lives in Falluja. And we're going to destroy him," BBC embed Paul Wood quoted Brandl as saying on the outskirts of Falluja

Source:
Aljazeera + Agencies
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