[QODLink]
Archive
Tunisia seeks to save Maghreb union
Tunisia's president tried to salvage the Arab Maghreb Union in a phone call to Libyan President Muammar al-Qadhafi on Thursday.
Last Modified: 10 Dec 2004 12:23 GMT
President bin Ali is pressing for reform of the 16-year-old body
Tunisia's president tried to salvage the Arab Maghreb Union in a phone call to Libyan President Muammar al-Qadhafi on Thursday.

The call by Zain al-Abidin bin Ali came a day after Libya announced the end of its presidency of the group, insisting the North African body had failed to achieve its goal of cooperation.

Bin Ali expressed his concern to the Libyan leader about the decision, then contacted Algerian President Abd al-Aziz Bouteflika to press for reform of the 16-year-old body.

In a statement on Wednesday, the Libyan foreign ministry said "the march of the union has stalled and violations are many ... therefore, Libya has decided to leave this union to its people".

The ministry did not make it clear whether Libya would withdraw from the union, which groups Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco and Tunisia. The chairmanship rotates among the five heads of state.

The union was founded in 1988 with an aim of promoting cooperation among its members, but has been dogged by disputes.

Source:
Aljazeera + Agencies
Topics in this article
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Private citizens take initiative to help 'irregular' migrants, accusing governments of excessive focus on security.
Indonesia's cassava plantations are being killed by mealybugs, and thousands of wasps will be released to stop them.
Violence in Ain al-Arab has prompted many Kurdish Syrians to flee to Turkey, but others are returning to battle ISIL.
Unelected representatives quietly iron out logistics of massive TPP and TTIP deals among US, Europe, and Asia-Pacific.
Led by students concerned for their future with 'nothing to lose', it remains to be seen who will blink first.