[QODLink]
Archive
UK mulls new anti-terror legislation
The United Kingdom is considering a range of new anti-terrorism laws including special courts to try suspects.
Last Modified: 21 Nov 2004 00:57 GMT
London has been bracing itself for possible attacks
The United Kingdom is considering a range of new anti-terrorism laws including special courts to try suspects.

Disclosing this on Sunday, British Home Secretary David Blunkett said the new measures, to be introduced only if Prime Minister Tony Blair's Labour government is re-elected next year, would allow evidence gained from telephone tapping to be used in trials.

Blunkett said people who had not committed an offence but were suspected of planning terrorism acts could have their actions restricted by so-called civil orders, similar to a system of anti-social behaviour orders introduced recently to target repeat offenders.

The proposals will most likely alarm civil liberties campaigners.

Special trials

Blunkett, interviewed by the ITV television channel, said special terrorism trials with judges sitting alone were being considered.

The United Kingdom, as a close ally of the United States both in Iraq and in the "war on terrorism", is bracing itself for possible attack by groups such as al-Qaida.

A top British policeman said earlier this year that an attack was more a matter of when, rather than if.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Featured
Anti-government secrecy organisation struggling for relevance without Julian Assange at the helm.
After decades of overfishing, Japan is taking aim at increasing the number of bluefin tuna in the ocean.
Chinese scientists are designing a particle-smashing collider so massive it could encircle a city.
Critics say the government is going full-steam ahead on economic recovery at the expense of human rights.
Spirits are high in Scotland's 'Whisky Capital of the World' with one distillery thirsty for independence.
join our mailing list