Report puts Falluja civilian toll at 600

An independent website that routinely reports the civilian and military body counts in Iraq said the US siege of Falluja last April has resulted in the deaths of 600 civilians, including 300 children.

    Iraq Body Counts puts at 300 the number of children killed so far

    Press spokesman of Iraq Body Count (IBC), John Sloboda, said on Friday that data recently released to the public by the Iraqi Health Ministry had allowed IBC to resolve a problem they have been struggling with for months: "How to reconcile casualty figures reported by local doctors of 800 total dead with a much lower estimate, [280 dead] produced in short order by the Iraqi Health Ministry (IHM)."

    Sloboda said, "

    Details of our analysis are provided on the website, but it now appears incontrovertible that the IHM estimate was quietly withdrawn once media attention moved away from Falluja, leading us to conclude that their estimate was acknowledged to be flawed."

    The IBC went on to say that its report, which is based on multiply cited accounts from doctors and eyewitnesses, confirms that no less than 308 of those killed were women and children.

    "This number demonstrates the huge impact of US attacks on civilian areas, and allows the conclusion to be drawn that many of the males killed must also have been non-combatants," IBC said in a press statement.

    "There are clear reports of 600 people killed in total up until April 12th, most of them killed before US forces began to permit women and children to be evacuated from the town," it added. 

    SOURCE: Aljazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    The Muslims of South Korea

    The Muslims of South Korea

    The number of Muslims in South Korea is estimated to be around 100,000, including foreigners.

    Gender violence in India: 'Daughters are not a burden'

    Gender violence in India: 'Daughters are not a burden'

    With female foeticide still widespread, one woman tells her story of being mutilated for giving birth to her daughters.

    Zimbabwe: What's happening?

    Zimbabwe: What's happening?

    Situation tense as thousands march in Harare to call for Robert Mugabe's resignation days after military takeover.