[QODLink]
Archive
US charges Briton with 'terror'
A British computer expert has been charged in a United States court with using websites to recruit for al-Qaida, the Taliban and Chechens.
Last Modified: 06 Oct 2004 23:36 GMT
Babar Ahmad is accused of supporting the likes of al-Qaida
A British computer expert has been charged in a United States court with using websites to recruit for al-Qaida, the Taliban and Chechens.

Arrested in London in August and awaiting extradition to the US, Babar Ahmad, 30, was on Wednesday also indicted for supplying fighters of the banned groups with gas masks, night-vision goggles and camouflage suits.

His indictment accuses him of supporting terrorism, conspiring to kill Americans and laundering money.

"The acts of terrorism specifically involved violence against persons, including murder, and violence against property in those countries to achieve political, religious and ideological ends," assistant US attorney Robert M.Appleton said.

Charges

Ahmad allegedly ran several sites, including Azzam.com, which US investigators say were used to funnel money to terrorists.

"Azzam Publications has been set up to propagate the call for jihad ... to incite the believers and also, secondly, to raise some money for the brothers," the website apparently said.

Ahmad allegedly recruited
fighters for Chechen separatists

The site allegedly encouraged people to train in street combat, land mine operations and sniper skills.

Financial donors were told to smuggle cash into Pakistan and pass it to the Taliban consul-general, investigators said.

"If you are supporting the Taliban and the Taliban is killing American soldiers, we are alleging you are conspiring to kill American citizens abroad," Connecticut US attorney Kevin O'Connor said.

The charges were filed in Connecticut because Ahmad allegedly used an internet service provider in the state to host one of his sites.

Ahmad said little during his August court appearance in London. When asked if he understood the charges against him, he replied: "Not really. It's all a bit confusing to me."

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
More than one-quarter of Gaza's population has been displaced, causing a humanitarian crisis.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Muslim charities claim discrimination after major UK banks began closing their accounts.
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Featured
Thousands of Houthi supporters have called for the fall of Yemen's government. But what do the Houthis really want?
New ration reductions and movement restrictions have refugees from Myanmar anxious about their future in Thailand.
US lawyers say poor translations of election materials disenfranchise Native voters.
US drones in Pakistan have killed thousands since 2004. How have leaders defended or decried these deadly planes?
Residents count the cost of violence after black American teenager shot dead by white Missouri police officer.
join our mailing list