[QODLink]
Archive
Khartoum students torch building
Armed police have used tear gas in Khartoum to break up a demonstration by students who burned down a university building to protest against high hall fees.
Last Modified: 10 Oct 2004 01:44 GMT
People have also protested against UN intervention in Darfur
Armed police have used tear gas in Khartoum to break up a demonstration by students who burned down a university building to protest against high hall fees.

One student said his colleagues had been locked out of their halls after failing to pay the fees demanded by the administration. 

"They locked the doors but all our clothes and belongings were still inside and we have nowhere else to sleep," said 21-year-old student Badr al-Din from White Nile state, who asked that his full name not be published.

"So the students got angry and set fire to the offices of the student support fund," he said on Saturday.

Muhammad, a student who also declined to give his family name, said between 50 and 100 armed police had fired tear gas into the crowd and beaten students with sticks to disperse the demonstration.

Police at the scene said no one was hurt in the disturbance, which began at about 5pm (1400 GMT).

Source:
Reuters
Topics in this article
People
Featured on Al Jazeera
Muslim volunteers face questioning and threat of arrest, while aid has been disrupted or blocked, charities say.
Six months on, outrage and sorrow over the mass schoolgirl abduction has disappeared - except for families in Nigeria.
ISIL combatants seeking an 'exit strategy' from Mideast conflict need positive reinforcement back home, analysts say.
European nation hit by a wave of Islamophobia as many young fighters join ISIL in Syria and Iraq.
Featured
Lacking cohesive local ground forces to attack in tandem, coalition air strikes will have limited effect, experts say.
Hindu right-wing groups run campaign against what they say is Muslim conspiracy to convert Hindu girls into Islam.
Six months on, outrage and sorrow over the mass schoolgirl abduction has disappeared - except for families in Nigeria.
Muslim caretakers maintain three synagogues in eastern Indian city, which was once home to a thriving Jewish community.
Amid fresh ISIL gains, officials in Anbar province have urged the Iraqi government to request foreign ground troops.