[QODLink]
Archive
Criminal charges against Chalabi 'dropped'

Iraqi politician Ahmad Chalabi has said that counterfeiting charges against him have been dropped.

Last Modified: 01 Sep 2004 16:17 GMT
An arrest warrant was issued against Ahmad Chalabi in August

Iraqi politician Ahmad Chalabi has said that counterfeiting charges against him have been dropped.

Chalabi on Wednesday said an Iraqi judge had informed him to this effect.

 

A former US ally, Chalabi also told reporters that an arrest warrant for his nephew Salim Chalabi, who was supervising Saddam Hussein's trial, had been reduced to a summons and he would return to Iraq to face it. Salim Chalabi was accused of murder.
   

Ahmad Chalabi was speaking hours after an armed group opened fire on his convoy as he returned to Baghdad from the southern city of Najaf. He escaped injury but two aides were wounded.

 

Denial

   

Both men have denied the charges against them and said they were politically motivated.

   

The charge against Salim Chalabi raised questions about the fate and credibility of Hussein's trial.

   

After falling out with Washington, the elder Chalabi has tried to project himself as a popular Shia leader ahead of Iraq's landmark elections in January.

 

An Iraqi judge issued the warrant against Ahmad Chalabi in August, accusing him of a complex counterfeiting scheme involving old Iraqi dinars. Since the warrant was issued, however, Iraqi authorities had declined to act on it.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Private citizens take initiative to help 'irregular' migrants, accusing governments of excessive focus on security.
Indonesia's cassava plantations are being killed by mealybugs, and thousands of wasps will be released to stop them.
Violence in Ain al-Arab has prompted many Kurdish Syrians to flee to Turkey, but others are returning to battle ISIL.
Unelected representatives quietly iron out logistics of massive TPP and TTIP deals among US, Europe, and Asia-Pacific.
Led by students concerned for their future with 'nothing to lose', it remains to be seen who will blink first.