[QODLink]
Archive
Indonesia blast targets Australian embassy
A huge explosion just outside the Australian embassy in Indonesia's capital has killed at least three people and injured many more.
Last Modified: 09 Sep 2004 06:49 GMT
Indonesian police have already begun an investigation
A huge explosion just outside the Australian embassy in Indonesia's capital has killed at least three people and injured many more.

The blast in the busy Kuningan district in South Jakarta on Thursday morning damaged the security fence around the embassy and destroyed cars parked inside the compound.

Local journalists said they had seen at least three dead bodies at the scene. They also reported that embassy staff and residents suffered injuries from flying shards of glass when the explosion shattered dozens of office windows.

The blast was heard from as far as two kilometres. A resident in Tebet, about two kilometres away, said she felt the ground shook.

Investigation

The Jakarta Police Chief Inspector General Firman Gani has already begun an investigation.

Australia's foreign affairs department has warned its citizens against non-essential travel to the fourth most populous nation in the world.

PM John Howard told journalists that although it was unclear who was responsible for the blast, it appears to have been caused by a car bomb.

Indonesia has been hit by sporadic bomb attacks in recent years, including blasts in Bali in October 2002 that killed 202 people and at a luxury Jakarta hotel in August 2003 that killed 12 - all of which police linked to the outlawed Islamist group, the Jemaah Islamiya.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.