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Iran to rethink uranium enrichment

Iran

Last Modified: 19 Jun 2004 09:48 GMT
Hassan Rohani says Iran will abide by non-proliferation treaty

Iran's chief nuclear negotiator has said the Islamic republic will review its suspension of uranium enrichment after a tough UN resolution.

"Iran will review its decision regarding suspension and we will announce our decision in the coming days," Hassan Rohani said on Saturday in Tehran.

   

He added that Iran had no secret uranium enrichment sites and that the country would continue cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

 

Iran will not pull out of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and will continue to allow rigorous inspections by the IAEA, he said.

  

Accusations

 

"Iran will respect the NPT agreement and will not withdraw from it, and will work within the framework of the safeguards and will continue to implement the additional protocol," Rohani said.

   

The United States says Iran's nuclear programme is a front for building an atomic weapon. Iran denies this, insisting its ambitions are limited to generating electricity.

   

The UN resolution sharply rebuked Iran on Friday for failing to cooperate fully with IAEA inspectors.

   

Any resumption of enrichment would provoke a major crisis. Enrichment is a process of purifying uranium for use in nuclear power plants or, if carried far enough, in bombs.

Source:
Agencies
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