[QODLink]
Archive
Downloading music made 'easy'

EasyGroup, the holding company of no-frills British airline easyJet, has announced plans to launch an online music store allowing customers to download tunes for free.

Last Modified: 16 Jun 2004 22:11 GMT
EasyGroup says people won't have to worry about copyrights

EasyGroup, the holding company of no-frills British airline easyJet, has announced plans to launch an online music store allowing customers to download tunes for free.

EasyGroup founder Stelios Haji-Ioannou said on Wednesday that "easyMusic" would incorporate the principle of 'copyleft', which meant customers did not have to adhere to copyright laws, allowing them to download songs for free and exchange them with other people infinitely.

But he stressed this would apply only to songs produced by unknown artists who wished to gain publicity.

"Music should be free," Haji-Ioannou told reporters, adding that would-be pop idols should not have to pay to copyright their songs.

"Why waste money with lawyers if you don't know if your music is valuable?" he said.

Customers wishing to download music by well-known artists will have to pay however, Haji-Ioannou said, a day after US computer maker Apple launched the European arm of its iTunes online music store, which will charge 99 eurocents ($1.20) for each song downloaded.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Featured on Al Jazeera
UNHCR says hundreds of people trapped in Yaloke town risk death if they are not evacuated to safety urgently.
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Featured
Long-standing dispute over Christian use of the word 'Allah' raises concerns about a very un-Merry Christmas.
The threat posed by ISIL has prompted thousands of young Kurds to join the PKK.
Baja California - with its own grim history of disappeared people - finds a voice in the fight against violence.
Russian feminist rockers fight system holding 700,000 - the world's largest per capita prison population after the US.
Weeks of growing protests against Muslims continue in Dresden with 15,000 hitting the streets last Monday.