Caribbean flood toll continues to rise

The death toll from devastating floods and landslides in Haiti and Dominican Republic has risen to 1,950 with the discovery of more bodies.

    Hundreds died when rivers burst embankments

    Rescue workers dug through mud and debris for bodies three days after torrential rains sent rivers of mud and swirling waters through Hispaniola, the Caribbean island shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

    Haiti's death toll stood at 1,660 while authorities in Dominican Republic said they have recovered 300 bodies, mostly from the town of Jimani, where a river burst its banks and swept away homes.

    Extending help

    In Haiti, troops from a US-led peacekeeping force flew helicopter loads of bottled water, fruit and bread to the town of Fond Verette.

    The floodwaters flattened fields of crops and ripped apart crude shacks fashioned from sticks and sheets of iron.

    In Dominican Republic, President Hipolito Mejia declared a day of national mourning for Thursday.

    Dogs trained to sniff out bodies were sent to join the recovery effort. Several hundred people are still missing.

    The European Union was meanwhile preparing a package worth $ 2.43 million for the victims. The United States has announced it was giving $50,000 to help the relief effort.

    Japan said it would give $100,000 in emergency aid.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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