[QODLink]
Archive
Vanunu seeks to surrender citizenship
Due for release from prison this month, Israel's nuclear whistleblower Mordechai Vanunu has submitted a formal request to renounce his Israeli citizenship. 
Last Modified: 03 Apr 2004 23:40 GMT
The nuclear whistleblower has spent 18 years in jail
Due for release from prison this month, Israel's nuclear whistleblower Mordechai Vanunu has submitted a formal request to renounce his Israeli citizenship. 

Israel's Channel two television on Saturday reported that Vanunu, who completes an 18 year prison term on 21 April, had sent a letter from the jail to the Israeli Interior Ministry asking to give up his citizenship.

Vanunu, it is understood, is seeking to give up his citizenship to avoid confinement in the country after his release.

Uncertain future

But informed sources said Vanunu could find it difficult for his request to be granted. Interior Ministry regulations state only Israelis living abroad can renounce their citizenship.

Vanunu, who worked at Israel's main reactor in the southern town of Dimona, gave Britain's Sunday Times newspaper in 1986 details about the facility, leading independent experts to conclude Israel has more than 100 nuclear warheads.

Refusing to comment on Vanunu's request, an Interior Ministry spokeswoman has said all Israelis have the right to submit such a request, although not all cases are approved.

"It depends on many factors and individual circumstances," she said. "Every case is different. Every Israeli has the right to submit a request to give up his or her citizenship, but there is no guarantee it will be approved."

Israeli security sources have said Israel will ban the former atomic reactor technician from travelling abroad after his release for a probationary period, and monitor him closely.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
UNHCR says hundreds of people trapped in Yaloke town risk death if they are not evacuated to safety urgently.
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Featured
Long-standing dispute over Christian use of the word 'Allah' raises concerns about a very un-Merry Christmas.
The threat posed by ISIL has prompted thousands of young Kurds to join the PKK.
Baja California - with its own grim history of disappeared people - finds a voice in the fight against violence.
Russian feminist rockers fight system holding 700,000 - the world's largest per capita prison population after the US.
Weeks of growing protests against Muslims continue in Dresden with 15,000 hitting the streets last Monday.