Libya pledges to improve human rights

Rights group Amnesty International has said Libya has promised to take into account recommendations to improve its human rights record.

    Al-Qadhafi has sought to end Libya's international isolation

    The assurance came after Amnesty concluded its first visit to 

    Libya in 15 years, which included a meeting with President Muammar

    al-Qadhafi.

    Amnesty believes it is the first major human rights group to

    hold a research mission in the North African country since its

    last visit in 1989, as Libya continues its efforts to rejoin the

    international community.

    Four Amnesty delegates spent two weeks in the country and

    returned on Sunday.

    Political prisoners

    Amnesty said it had

    called for the immediate release of political prisoners and the

    launch of an independent investigation into people who had

    disappeared in and outside Libya.

    "Libya has been in the process of opening up for some time.

    They have taken a positive step in the human rights

    arena, though this has been limited. It is going to have to be

    serious engagement and serious change"

    Sara Hmud,
    Amnesty International

    Although the team was able to visit prisoners, Amnesty expressed

    concern about the lengthy detention of defendants, particularly by

    the domestic security services, which it said violated Libyan law

    and international norms.

    "We are pleased with the unprecedented access we were given

    to the Libyan authorities and others, particularly to

    prisoners," said Claudio Cordone, who headed the Amnesty

    delegation.

    The group intends to publish a report based on its findings

    shortly, but said despite the positive reaction of the

    Libyans to the visit, there was still much work to be done.

    WMDs

    "Libya has been in the process of opening up for some time,"

    said Sara Hamud, Amnesty's Libya expert who was part of the

    delegation.

    "They have taken a positive step in the human rights

    arena, though this has been limited. It is going to have to be

    serious engagement and serious change."

    The visit comes a few months after Libya took repsonsibilty for the downing of an American airliner over Scotland in 1988.

    And in December Libya also agreed to abandon its weapons of mass destruction programmes, in a move that was welcomed by the international community.

    SOURCE: Aljazeera + Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Venezuela in default: What next?

    Venezuela in default: What next?

    As the oil-rich country fails to pay its debt, we examine what happens next and what it means for its people.

    The Muslims of South Korea

    The Muslims of South Korea

    The number of Muslims in South Korea is estimated to be around 100,000, including foreigners.

    What is Mohammed bin Salman's next move?

    What is Mohammed bin Salman's next move?

    There are reports Saudi Arabia is demanding money from the senior officials it recently arrested.