[QODLink]
Archive
Turkmen immortalise president's father

Turkmenistan's parliament has added to the personality cult surrounding President Saparmurat Niyazov by dedicating this year to the president's deceased father.

Last Modified: 06 Mar 2004 12:58 GMT
Niyazov (C) has declared himself president for life

Turkmenistan's parliament has added to the personality cult surrounding President Saparmurat Niyazov by dedicating this year to the president's deceased father.

The parliament took the decision in order to "immortalise the sacred image and bright memory" of Atamurat Niyazov, who is officially said to have died in fighting in southern Russia during World War II, the Neitralny Turkmenistan newspaper said on Saturday. 

Atamurat Niyazov showed "unlimited love for his country" and "served selflessly to ensure the survival of current and future generations", added the paper. 

Saparmurat Niyazov, 64, has ruled this remote former Soviet republic with an iron hand since the Soviet Union's collapse in 1991 and was declared president-for-life and Turkmenbashi (father of all Turkmen) in 1999. 

Golden statues and portraits of the president can be found on almost every street in the country and towns and regions are named after him and his parents. 

Western institutions have criticised the Turkmen president for ruthlessly cracking down on dissidents.

Source:
AFP
Topics in this article
People
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Western fighters have streamed into the Middle East to help 'liberate' Arab countries such as Syria and Libya.
The Pakistani government is proposing reform of the nation's madrassas, which are accused of fostering terrorism.
Weaving and handicrafts are being re-taught to a younger generation of Iraqi Kurds, but not without challenges.
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Featured
Al Jazeera investigation uncovers allegations of beatings and rape in Kenya's ongoing anti-terrorism operation.
Incumbent Joyce Banda has a narrow lead, but anything is possible in Malawi's May 20 elections.
Western fighters have streamed into the Middle East to help 'liberate' Arab countries such as Syria and Libya.
The Pakistani government is proposing reform of the nation's madrassas, which are accused of fostering terrorism.
Grass-roots campaigns for female candidates are making an impact in India's first nationwide elections since 2009.
join our mailing list