Bush ads upset families of 9/11 victims

Families of September 11 victims have reacted angrily to images of the attacks being used in the campaign commercials of US President George Bush.

    The president is seeking to touch raw nerves to get votes

    "Families are enraged," Bill Doyle, who is active in several September 11 family groups, said.

    "What I think is distasteful is that the president is trying to use 9/11 as a springboard for his re-election."

    "It's entirely wrong. He's had 3,500 deaths on his watch, including Iraq," said Doyle, whose 25-year-old son Joseph died in the attacks on the World Trade Centre.

    However, Rudolph Giuliani, the Republican who was mayor of New York when the attacks occurred, issued a statement through the Bush-Cheney campaign defending the ads.

    "His leadership on that day is central to his record and his continued leadership is critical to our ultimate success against world terrorism," Giuliani said.

    Controversial commercials

    Two ads refer to the hijacked airliner attacks that killed about 3,000 as the Bush campaign seeks to present him as a leader. One ad shows World Trade Centre ruins behind an American flag. Another shows firefighters removing the flag-draped remains of a victim.

    "What I think is distasteful is that the president is trying to use 9/11 as a springboard for his re-election"

    Bill Doyle, 
    father of a 9/11 victim

    Ron Willett of Missouri, who lost his 29-year-old son in the attacks, said he was disgusted when he saw the ads. "I would vote for Saddam Hussein before I would vote for Bush."

    "It think it is an atrocity," his wife Lucy, added. "He should not be allowed to use those images at all."

    The International Association of Fire Fighters, which has endorsed the campaign for Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry, denounced the ads as "hypocrisy at its worst."

    "I am disappointed but not surprised that the president would try to trade on the heroism of those fire fighters," the union's general president Harold Schaitberger said.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    More than 300 people died in Somalia but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Japan's third-largest steelmaker has admitted it faked data on parts used in cars, planes and trains.