Saudi thinkers debate 'extremism'

Saudi Muslim clerics and intellectuals have adopted a series of recommendations on combating extremism, following a second round of "national dialogue" in the holy city of Mecca.

    Saudi Arabia has been hit by a wave of killer bomb attacks

    The recommendations will be delivered to Crown Prince Abd Allah bin Abd al-Aziz, Saudi Arabia's de facto ruler, on Saturday. 

    A statement from the dialogue participants, did not say what the recommendations were.

    Some 60 participants, including 10 women who took part in the deliberations via a video conference link, were joined by 15 researchers for round two of the "Convention for National Dialogue" launched in June.

    The first landmark meeting held in Riyadh ended with a call for wide-ranging reforms and led to the establishment of a dialogue centre which hosted the latest deliberations.

    Limited reform

    Saudi CrownPrince Abd Allah Bin
    Abd al-Aziz will get the plan 

    Since then, Saudi authorities have raised the prospect of limited reforms in the conservative kingdom, which is engaged in a massive crackdown against Islamic groups blamed for a series of suicide bombings in Riyadh in May and November that left more than 50 people dead.

    Saudi leaders promised in October to organize the first ever polls in the kingdom within a year to elect half the members of new municipal councils.

    Semi-official reports have since said polls would be held within three years to fill one third of the 120 seats of the appointed Shura (consultative) Council, and that half the members of regional councils would be elected within two years.

    SOURCE: AFP


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