"He admitted to the crime," chief prosecutor Krister Petersson
told reporters on Wednesday. But prosecutors were not yet ready to reveal exactly what he had said, Petersson added. 

The TT news agency reported that the confession came during an interrogation session on Tuesday, which had been convened at the request of Mijailovic's lawyer, Peter Althin. 

Althin told TT that during the interrogation, which lasted
about an hour, the 25-year-old suspect gave a detailed account of events on the day of the murder, 10 September,
2003. 

Lindh, who had been tipped to become Swedish prime minister one day, was fatally stabbed in a crowded department store, a murder that stunned Sweden. 

Mijailovic was arrested later in September and police matched
his DNA with DNA found at the murder scene, according to
prosecutors. 

Investigation

Althin said on Wednesday he had not sought any further information from prosecutors after working his way through a 1000-page summary of the investigation. 

Anna Lindh was stabbed to death
last Sep in a crowded store

The lawyer had had until Wednesday to make a request for additional information and his decision to approve the report clears the way for a speedy indictment of Mijailovic. 

Mijailovic is now likely to be formally indicted on 12 January,
TT said, and Petersson told AFP he expected the trial to open a week later at the latest. 

However, Althin said the Stockholm district court had set no date yet and it might order a psychiatric examination of
Mijailovic before the trial could get underway. 

Before Tuesday, Mijailovic had denied any involvement in the
stabbing, although media reports said that he had confessed to several people, including his mother. 

Criminal record

Born in Sweden of Serb parents, Mijailovic has a criminal record and was sentenced in 1997 for attacking his father with a kitchen knife. 

Swedish media reports have speculated that Mijailovic, believed to be mentally unstable, was obsessed by several famous people, and hated Lindh for backing the NATO air strikes against Belgrade during the war in Kosovo in 1999. 

If convicted, Mijailovic could face a sentence of up to life in
prison, although in practice no-one serves more than 14 years in Swedish jails.