[QODLink]
Archive
Turkish ex-PM sentenced to jail

Turkey's appeals court has sentenced former prime minister and Islamic leader Necmettin Erbakan to two years and four months in jail for misappropriating party funds.&

Last Modified: 02 Dec 2003 20:36 GMT
Erbakan was dislodged from office in June 1997

Turkey's appeals court has sentenced former prime minister and Islamic leader Necmettin Erbakan to two years and four months in jail for misappropriating party funds. 

Erbakan, 77, a veteran politician, was among 70 Islamists charged with misappropriating one trillion lira ($3.6 million) of funds from the now-defunct Welfare Party.

   

He has the right to appeal once against the sentence. If his appeal fails, he will probably spend one year in prison, the Anatolian news agency said.

 

He would also lose the right to stand in elections or join a political party.

 

Charges

   

The rotund Erbakan served as prime minister in a coalition with conservatives for one year until the army helped dislodge him from office in June 1997 after deciding he posed a threat to Turkey's strictly secular political order.

 

The charges against him date back to that time, when, Anatolian said, Welfare Party officials tried to squirrel away cash before the party was shut down.

 

Erbakan's sentencing comes at a time when secular Turkey is cracking down on Islamists after four bomb attacks in November that killed 61 people.

 

Erbakan has never publicly advocated violence in the pursuit of political aims.

   

Immunity

 

Erdogan's AKP traces its roots
to Islamist parties

Two lawmakers from the current ruling party, the Justice and Development Party (AKP), were also suspects in the case but could not be charged because they have parliamentary immunity.

   

Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan's AKP traces its roots back to banned Islamist parties such as Welfare, though he has steered a more pro-Western course than Erbakan. The AKP says it does not follow a secret religious agenda.

   

Nevertheless Turkey's secular establishment, including the army, monitors its actions closely and sometimes clashes with the government, especially on the issue of whether Muslim women can wear headscarves in public places.

Source:
Reuters
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
More than one-quarter of Gaza's population has been displaced, causing a humanitarian crisis.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Muslim charities claim discrimination after major UK banks began closing their accounts.
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Featured
Report on child sex abuse in British Asian community highlights issues that may affect the entire nation.
Taliban makes quick gains in Afghanistan with little opposition from Afghan army as US withdrawal begins.
Analysts say China moving back toward 1950s-era public trials aimed at shaming and intimidation.
Record numbers of migrants have made harrowing sea journeys to Italy and Greece this year.
In Vietnam, 40 percent of all pregnancies are terminated each year, a rate that health officials are hoping to reduce.
join our mailing list